SSCI Appoints Dr. Owen Brown as Vice President of Research and Development

January 25, 2017 by  

WOBURN, Mass., Jan. 23, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Scientific Systems Company, Inc., an industry leader and pioneer in advanced intelligent and autonomous systems, announced today that Dr. Owen Brown has joined the company as Vice President of Research and Development. He will be responsible for the strategic development, implementation, and oversight of all new programs in autonomy, robotics, machine learning, artificial intelligence, computer vision, advanced GNC, and data science. He will be responsible for operations in the National Capital Region. Dr. Brown brings a background of proven leadership, program management excellence, game-changing innovation, and operational military experience.

As a former Program Manager for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Brown developed, and managed radically innovative and highly successful space systems for national defense. His fractionation concept of autonomous and distributed networks of space systems, which led to DARPA’s System F6 program, has influenced future space architectures worldwide. His leadership in a fast paced multiple spacecraft demonstration program has had a lasting impact on the nation’s space operations. In addition, he led the SPHERES formation flying experiment initiative, which is based in the International Space Station. After his DARPA tour, Dr. Brown served as the Chief Technology Officer for KTSi and, after sale of the company, transitioned to provide technology and policy leadership for SAIC. Recently he completed service as a member of the Space Defense and Protection committee for the National Academies of Science. He is a former nuclear submarine officer with operational experience on fast attack submarines. Brown retired from the US Navy Reserve after providing operational support for P-3 anti-submarine aircraft and then acquisition support as an Engineering Duty Officer. He holds a M.S. and Ph.D. in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering from Stanford University.

“Owen brings a proven track record of creating disruptive technical concepts, managing their development, and delivering them to the warfighter, scientist, and other customers,” said Scientific Systems CEO Dr. Raman Mehra. “We welcome him to the Scientific Systems team at an exciting time, when our company’s portfolio of capabilities in autonomy and intelligent distributed systems is enabling the Department of Defense (DoD), NASA, and other government customers not only keep pace with the rapid pace of technological change, but to be the creators of that change.”

“Scientific Systems is leading the way in the development of the core autonomous and intelligent system technologies that are becoming the enabling foundation for national defense and intelligence systems, scientific exploration, and civil agency support,” said Brown. “In the commercial world, these technologies will revolutionize the way each person goes about their daily lives.  I’m very excited to part of an incredibly capable team of scientists and engineers who are dedicated to their work.”

About Scientific Systems Company Inc.
Since 1976 Scientific Systems Company Inc. (SSCI) has been developing the brains and nervous system for manned and unmanned vehicles to operate autonomously and accomplish their missions in difficult environments for defense and commercial applications. Based in Woburn, MA, SSCI is a leading innovator in performing research and technology development for various NASA and US DoD agencies. SSCI is a provider of intelligent and autonomous software systems for land, sea, air, and space systems, GPS-denied navigation systems, fusion, tracking and sensor management technologies, collaborative and adversarial autonomy, mission planning systems, and a variety of revolutionary signal processing systems. For more information, visit www.ssci.com or contact SSCI at (781) 933-5355 or info@ssci.com.

Media Contact:
Pat McLaughlin
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949-273-5108

The Economist magazine highlights SSCI’s GPS-denied navigation solution, ImageNav

December 6, 2016 by  

Please click on the following link to read an article that was published in the Economist magazine that highlights SSCI’s ImageNav solution as part of a new generation of GPS-denied weapon systems.

SSCI is developing algorithms for swarming UAVs to counter anti-access/area denial environments

December 6, 2016 by  

Please click on the following link to see an article about Swarms that refers to the CODE Phase II program, for which SSCI is is developing algorithms for swarming UAVs to counter anti-access/area denial environments.

 

 

DARPA project takes flight in Medfield

November 28, 2016 by  

darpa-medfield

By Stephen Press
Hometown Weekly Staff

When one hears the words “Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency” (DARPA) and “military research,” one’s thoughts typically start revolving around the exotic, the clandestine, the fantastical. Neutron bombs exploding over desolate salt flats. Laser-wielding cyborgs running through specially-designed obstacle courses. Cold fusion engines powering aircraft as they take off from Area 51.

For his part, Hector Escobar, Senior Research Engineer at SSCI, could only smile. “The way we see it is that it’s more than that,” he said as a quadcopter drone took off nearby. Escobar had come to the Medfield State Hospital with Scientific Systems Company, Inc. (SSCI) to test an autonomous drone as part of a DARPA program. “More than the military,” Escobar continued, “it’s for so many different applications. It feels good to know that we could actually make some progress in technology, not only thinking about military applications, but in general.”

“SSCI’s Rapid Adaptive preDiction for Vision-based Autonomous Navigation and Evasion program (Rapid ADVANCE) is based on a fundamentally new approach to reactive navigation, resulting in very low size, weight, and power requirements for use on small UAVs,” reads a press release from SSCI.com, Scientific Systems Company’s website. “Under the direction of Dr. N. Andrew Browning, the SSCI project is part of DARPA’s Fast Lightweight Autonomy (FLA) program. The aim of this program is to develop and demonstrate the capability for small and fast (20 m/s) UAVs to fly autonomously through complex, cluttered environments.”

Simplified?

“What we basically want to do is have these drones fly autonomously in urban environments like this one. What a perfect environment, like an abandoned city, that we have here,” said Escobar, motioning at the terrain around him. “That’s why we’re actually using the Medfield State Hospital – so we can have actual buildings, actual roads, actual trees. We’re testing our algorithms here.

“The idea is that we have a start point and we have an end goal. We try to fly to it and back, and all autonomously.

“DARPA’s going to provide us a file that says ‘your target is five minutes this way and ten minutes this way,’ and that’s all we know. So then we have to traverse whatever environment they gave us and fly through it. That’s pretty much all we know – where we are and where is our end goal.”

In a nutshell, SSCI is developing a drone that can fly, completely on its own, to and from a given point, avoiding all obstacles on its way.

Oh yeah, and it can’t use GPS.

“The cool thing about this project is that it’s without GPS,” added Escobar. “We’re not using any GPS to navigate, so we’re doing everything visually using several algorithms that we developed.”

It also cannot map the terrain – all of the drone’s processing must be done on the fly.

“The idea of this program is also that it cannot use what is called SLAM, which is simultaneous localization and mapping,” said Escobar. “Most of the drones out there, the research in the universities, they’re doing basically a map. They start creating a map, so by the end of the run, they have a map of all the area.” Nearby, one of SSCI’s drones beeped – not unlike R2-D2 – as it prepared for an autonomous launch.

“We have shorter memory,” said Escobar. “We know where we are and where we’re going, and we can fly, avoiding all the obstacles. But on our way back, we’ll have to avoid them again because we are not [making a map]. That’s to make our algorithms faster and more cost-effective.”

Escobar excused himself to speak with his SSCI team – a crew of six men who had come out to test the fruits of their hours of coding. Grabbing one of the drones, they carried it to a nearby spot for its next run. A few moments later, the craft floated into the air, a pilot standing nearby only in case of emergency. The drone headed skywards, then made a bee-line for a distant spot on the State Hospital grounds. This was a live test, and it seemed to be going swimmingly as the drone’s programmers watched on proudly.

“It is very rewarding, I would say,” concluded Escobar “to see that you programmed something and then you can come out and try it.”

Scientific Systems Company, Inc. (SSCI) Receives DARPA XDATA contract to research new Machine Learning & Big Data Technologies

November 15, 2012 by  

Press Release Template

 

Scientific Systems Company, Inc. (SSCI) Receives DARPA XDATA contract to research new Machine Learning & Big Data Technologies

 

[Dateline]—SSCI, a leading developer and provider of Machine Learning, Big Data Analytics, AI & Intelligent Autonomy technologies, today announced receiving research funding from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop new and advanced Machine Learning software based on Automated Bayesian Cross-Categorization (ABC) family of algorithms for heterogeneous structured and unstructured databases.  This contract is part of DARPA’s XDATA program, a 4-year research effort to develop new computational techniques and open source software tools for processing and analyzing data, motivated by defense needs.  SSCI has been selected by DARPA as a performer in the technical area of scalable analytics and data processing technology.  The contract is administered by the Air Force Research Laboratory, Rome, NY.

Dr. Raman K. Mehra, CEO of SSCI remarked, “We are very excited and proud to be part of the DARPA’s XDATA program and look forward to collaborating with other awardees and developing open-source software for advanced Machine Learning, Big Data Analytics and Predictive Statistical Inference”.

SSCI’s team consists of senior researchers from MIT, U. of Louisville, and Prior Knowledge Inc.

Scientific Systems Company, Inc. (SSCI) pioneers products and technologies that provide the intelligence for unmanned ground, air and maritime vehicles to autonomously and collaboratively accomplish missions in difficult environments.  Our technologies are currently at work in the Tomahawk Cruise Missile Program and numerous other U.S. Department of Defense systems.

For more information on DARPA and the XDATA program, visit www.darpa.mil.

 

Unified Interceptor Assignment Algorithms (Missile Defense Agency)

December 9, 2011 by  

Unified Interceptor Assignment Algorithms  (Missile Defense Agency)

 Scientific Systems Company announces that it has been awarded a contract by the Missile Defense Agency to continue development of their Unified Interceptor Assignment Algorithms for pairing incoming missiles with the most capable interception platform.  The algorithms were previously demonstrated in simulation under a Phase I Small Business Innovation and Research Program.  This contract continues SSCI’s industry-leading work in using the Unified Bayesian methodology to intelligently optimize resource management in a variety of applications ranging from sensor networks to robotic vehicles or missile defense.

 The two-year contract is valued at approximately $1 M.  SSCI is supported in this project by the Mission Systems & Sensor (MS2) division of Lockheed Martin. 

 

VERIFY II (AFRL Wright-Patterson)

December 9, 2011 by  

VERIFY II  (AFRL Wright-Patterson)

 Scientific Systems Company announces that it has been awarded a contract by the Air Force Research Lab at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base to continue development of their VERIFY system for sensor evaluation and integrity monitoring, previously demonstrated under a Phase I Small Business Innovation and Research Program. VERIFY monitors a sensor’s measurements and compares against other system data to evaluate trustworthiness of the measurements, which is especially valuable when SWaP constraints are prohibitive of full sensor redundancy.  This system will be used by manned and unmanned aircraft to detect anomalous readings in sensor data (primarily radar) which would indicate that the sensor is out of calibration or in need of maintenance. Because the VERIFY system can alert analysts, mission planners, and flight crews to the problem before the sensor fails—and when possible will mitigate the failure to continue obtaining usable data—VERIFY reduces the requirement for redundancy in sensors and missions to ensure that the needed information is obtained.

 “This project builds on SSCI’s long history of work in the prognostics and health monitoring field,” said Mr. Joe Jackson, principal engineer on the Phase II project.  “By reducing the need for spares and preemptive or reactive maintenance to produce confidence in the instruments’ performance, this project will produce a cost savings for the Air Force and help the warfighter collect actionable intelligence under adverse circumstances.”

 The two-year contract is valued at approximately $750,000.  SSCI is supported in this project by the Brigham Young University.

 

FAUST (Finite-field Algebra for Unbeatable Situational-awareness in Tactical networks) (U.S. Army)

December 9, 2011 by  

FAUST (Finite-field Algebra for Unbeatable Situational-awareness in Tactical networks) (U.S. Army)

 Scientific Systems Company announces that it has been awarded a contract by the U.S. Army, Aberdeen Proving Ground, to continue development of their Finite-field Algebra for Unbeatable Situational-awareness in Tactical networks (FAUST), previously demonstrated under a Phase I Small Business Innovation and Research Program.  The FAUST algorithms provide scalability and survivability for tactical networks connecting vehicles, robots, and soldiers, while efficiently synchronizing Situational Awareness information among all nodes.  This award extends SSCI’s ongoing work in a variety of specialized ad hoc networking techniques intended for airborne, man-portable, and unmanned vehicle networks.

 “The The value of FAUST is that it can quickly update large amounts of information across all nodes in the network, even if the network connectivity is intermittent,” said Mr. Carlos Gutierrez, lead engineer for the FAUST project.  By passing a description of the information rather than the information itself, FAUST reduces synch times by an order of magnitude compared to current algorithms.  “This has great applicability to wifi and cellular networks, where a large number of users could create a bottleneck in synchronization,” Mr. Gutierrez said.

 The two-year contract is valued at approximately $750,000, including options.  SSCI is supported in this project by Boston University. 

 

PNAV: Human Motion Labeling and Quantification for Personal Navigation

December 8, 2011 by  

PNAV: Human Motion Labeling and Quantification for Personal Navigation

Scientific Systems Company announces that it has been awarded a contract by the U.S. Army Computers and Electronics Research Development and Engineering Command (CERDEC), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, to continue development of their PNAV system for quantifying human motion for improved navigation in the absence of GPS.  The PNAV system uses low-cost accelerometers like those found in a smart phone to accurately determine whether a person is walking, crawling, jumping, climbing, ascending or descending stairs, or performing other actions.  The system uses GPS when available to learn an individual Soldier’s motion characteristics and feeds this information into the Army’s next-generation navigation system to locate a Soldier indoors or in tunnels or caves.

The two-year contract is valued at approximately $750,000.  SSCI is supported in this project by the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory and Honeywell Corporation. 

 

Distributed Battle Data Network (AFRL Wright-Patterson)

December 8, 2011 by  

Distributed Battle Data Network (AFRL Wright-Patterson)

 Scientific Systems Company announces that it has been awarded a contract by the Air Force Research Lab at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base to continue development of their Distributed Battle Data Network (DBDN) system, previously demonstrated under a Phase I Small Business Innovation and Research Program.  This system will be used by manned and unmanned aircraft and ground stations to detect and avoid enemy air defenses through innovative information sharing between all networked assets.  DBDN provides routing that automatically generates multi-path routes when they are needed to keep track of more network state information so routes will minimize exposure to enemy interference, and Disruption Tolerant Networking techniques to avoid data loss during short outages and increase detection information delivery. DBDN also provides network organization techniques to optimize detection information delivery to fusion nodes that can combine them to detect enemy emitters and methods for fast detection of congestion or link loss to trigger re-routing.

The two-year contract is valued at approximately $750,000.  SSCI is supported in this project by the BBN Technologies division of Raytheon.

 

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